Bao-Guo Li, He Zhang, Ming Li, Xue-Long Jiang, Peng-Fei Fan, Jiang Zhou, Song-Tao Guo, Xiao-Guang Qi, Jin-Hua Li, Ji-Qi Lu, Dong-Po Xia, Liang-Wei Cui, Zuo-Fu Xiang, Qi-Hai Zhou, Zhi-Pang Huang, Cheng-Ming Huang, Wen Xiao, Hui-Jian Hu, Zhi-Xin Zhou, Ming-Yong Chen, Da-Yong Li, Peng-Lai Fan, Yin Yang, Ru-Liang Pan. Achievements and challenges of primate conservation in China. Zoological Research: Diversity and Conservation, 2024, 1(1): 66-74. DOI: 10.24272/j.issn.2097-3772.2023.298
Citation: Bao-Guo Li, He Zhang, Ming Li, Xue-Long Jiang, Peng-Fei Fan, Jiang Zhou, Song-Tao Guo, Xiao-Guang Qi, Jin-Hua Li, Ji-Qi Lu, Dong-Po Xia, Liang-Wei Cui, Zuo-Fu Xiang, Qi-Hai Zhou, Zhi-Pang Huang, Cheng-Ming Huang, Wen Xiao, Hui-Jian Hu, Zhi-Xin Zhou, Ming-Yong Chen, Da-Yong Li, Peng-Lai Fan, Yin Yang, Ru-Liang Pan. Achievements and challenges of primate conservation in China. Zoological Research: Diversity and Conservation, 2024, 1(1): 66-74. DOI: 10.24272/j.issn.2097-3772.2023.298
  • The dual impact of climate change and human activities has precipitated a sharp decline in primate biodiversity globally. China is home to the most diverse primate species in the Northern hemisphere, which face severe ecological threats due to the expansion of modern agriculture, extensive exploitation and consumption of natural resources, and excessive land development during its transition from an agricultural to a modern society. In response, China has implemented various ecological conservation measures, including habitat restoration and protection. These efforts have made substantial strides in biodiversity conservation, with certain regions witnessing an increase in primate populations. In the current study, we conducted a systematic review of historical documents and field research data related to Chinese primates, evaluating the endangered status of primate species in China. Despite improvements in the habitats of most primate species and some population growth, many species still face severe threats, including declining and small populations. Species such as the Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri), eastern black crested gibbon (Nomascus nasutus), and Hainan gibbon (N. hainanus) remain particularly vulnerable due to their limited distribution ranges and extremely small populations. Insufficient scientific data, fragmented information, and not enough studies in conservation biology further compound the challenges. Moreover, there is a notable lack of detailed population monitoring data for species such as the Bengal slow loris (Nycticebus bengalensis), pygmy slow loris (N. pygmaeus), Indochinese gray langur (Trachypithecus crepusculus), Shortridge’s langur (T. shortridgei), and capped langur (T. pileatus), which hinders the development of practical and targeted conservation management strategies. Therefore, for national biodiversity conservation, there is an urgent need for specialized primate surveys, enhancing habitat protection and restoration, and increasing focus on cross-border conservation strategies and regional cooperation. There is also a need to establish a comprehensive and systematic research database platform, conduct continuous and in-depth research in primate biology, and actively engage in the scientific assessment of ecotourism. Additionally, strengthening public awareness and education on wildlife conservation remains essential. Such integrated and systematic efforts will provide scientific support for the current and future conservation and management of primate species in China.
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